biocanvas:

Cells from a rat with pheochromocytoma, a tumor of the neuroendocrine system that affects the adrenal glands.
Image by Dr. Torsten Wittmann, Scripps Research Institute.

biocanvas:

Cells from a rat with pheochromocytoma, a tumor of the neuroendocrine system that affects the adrenal glands.

Image by Dr. Torsten Wittmann, Scripps Research Institute.

sixpenceee:

Have you ever wondered why an ice pack relieves pain? Why should cold make the pain go away? 
It works because a cold object activates fast fibers in your spinal cord, while pain travels up to your brain in slow fibers. So when you press a cold pack against a sore muscle your fast fibers beat out the slow ones. You feel cold not pain. 
Source: The Body Has A Mind Of Its Own by Sandra & Matthew Blackeslee


There’s also a theory called the Gate Control Theory of Pain similar to this if anyone is interested! It explains why rubbing a knee you just banged on something makes it feel better.

sixpenceee:

Have you ever wondered why an ice pack relieves pain? Why should cold make the pain go away? 

It works because a cold object activates fast fibers in your spinal cord, while pain travels up to your brain in slow fibers. So when you press a cold pack against a sore muscle your fast fibers beat out the slow ones. You feel cold not pain. 

Source: The Body Has A Mind Of Its Own by Sandra & Matthew Blackeslee

There’s also a theory called the Gate Control Theory of Pain similar to this if anyone is interested! It explains why rubbing a knee you just banged on something makes it feel better.

(via sixpenceee)

neurosciencestuff:

A single spray of oxytocin improves brain function in children with autism
A single dose of the hormone oxytocin, delivered via nasal spray, has been shown to enhance brain activity while processing social information in children with autism spectrum disorders, Yale School of Medicine researchers report in a new study published in the Dec. 2 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
“This is the first study to evaluate the impact of oxytocin on brain function in children with autism spectrum disorders,” said first author Ilanit Gordon, a Yale Child Study Center adjunct assistant professor, whose colleagues on the study included senior author Kevin Pelphrey, the Harris Professor in the Child Study Center, and director of the Center for Translational Developmental Neuroscience at Yale.
Gordon, Pelphrey, and their colleagues conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 17 children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. The participants, between the ages of 8 and 16.5, were randomly given either oxytocin spray or a placebo nasal spray during a task involving social judgments. Oxytocin is naturally occurring hormone produced in the brain and throughout the body.
“We found that brain centers associated with reward and emotion recognition responded more during social tasks when children received oxytocin instead of the placebo,” said Gordon. “Oxytocin temporarily normalized brain regions responsible for the social deficits seen in children with autism.”
Gordon said oxytocin facilitated social attunement, a process that makes the brain regions involved in social behavior and social cognition activate more for social stimuli (such as faces) and activate less for non-social stimuli (such as cars).
“Our results are particularly important considering the urgent need for treatments to target social dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders,” Gordon added.

neurosciencestuff:

A single spray of oxytocin improves brain function in children with autism

A single dose of the hormone oxytocin, delivered via nasal spray, has been shown to enhance brain activity while processing social information in children with autism spectrum disorders, Yale School of Medicine researchers report in a new study published in the Dec. 2 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“This is the first study to evaluate the impact of oxytocin on brain function in children with autism spectrum disorders,” said first author Ilanit Gordon, a Yale Child Study Center adjunct assistant professor, whose colleagues on the study included senior author Kevin Pelphrey, the Harris Professor in the Child Study Center, and director of the Center for Translational Developmental Neuroscience at Yale.

Gordon, Pelphrey, and their colleagues conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 17 children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. The participants, between the ages of 8 and 16.5, were randomly given either oxytocin spray or a placebo nasal spray during a task involving social judgments. Oxytocin is naturally occurring hormone produced in the brain and throughout the body.

“We found that brain centers associated with reward and emotion recognition responded more during social tasks when children received oxytocin instead of the placebo,” said Gordon. “Oxytocin temporarily normalized brain regions responsible for the social deficits seen in children with autism.”

Gordon said oxytocin facilitated social attunement, a process that makes the brain regions involved in social behavior and social cognition activate more for social stimuli (such as faces) and activate less for non-social stimuli (such as cars).

“Our results are particularly important considering the urgent need for treatments to target social dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders,” Gordon added.

magicmedic:

Products of the Pituitary Gland

magicmedic:

Products of the Pituitary Gland

futureteacher93:

#hypothyroidism #hashimotos #thyroid

futureteacher93:

#hypothyroidism #hashimotos #thyroid

thecadaverousportrait:

In the 19th Century, doctors were reluctant to operate on thyroid tumors like the ones shown in this 1875 photograph. That’s because the gland was so full of blood vessels that serious bleeding was a real risk. That meant some patients, like this man, faced the threat of slow asphyxiation.

thecadaverousportrait:

In the 19th Century, doctors were reluctant to operate on thyroid tumors like the ones shown in this 1875 photograph. That’s because the gland was so full of blood vessels that serious bleeding was a real risk. That meant some patients, like this man, faced the threat of slow asphyxiation.

mothernaturenetwork:

Feed your thyroid: Nutrients and foods that nourish the thyroidWant to ensure good thyroid function through what you eat? The following foods contain nutrients helpful for thyroid function.

mothernaturenetwork:

Feed your thyroid: Nutrients and foods that nourish the thyroid
Want to ensure good thyroid function through what you eat? The following foods contain nutrients helpful for thyroid function.